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Thread: Installed Trijicon front sight on S&W revolver

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    Senior Member ctr's Avatar
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    Installed Trijicon front sight on S&W revolver

    The bottom feeders have been leaving the safe with regularity lately. Replaced by revolvers. Part of the downsizing plan.

    Anyway, I picked up a Smith and Wesson model 60 3" revolver a while back. Purchased a Trijicon front sight for it. Been meaning to install the sight and finally got around to doing just that this very evening.

    The factory front sight is pinned into a miter cut in the frame. The pin is a roll pin. It's supposed to be 1/16 inch but mine wasn't. Much smaller. I removed the cylinder and crane arm from the frame. Taped the frame on the side near the sight. Since the pin was so small I used a fine brass nail to drive the pin out. Then a few whacks with a mallet front to rear pushes the rear of the sight up out of the miter. Then gentle work frees the sight. That is the easy part.

    After cleaning the miter I fit tested the new sight. A few whacks of the mallet forces the sight into the barrel. Using a nail I scribed each side of the sight in a block. Removing the sight it's now time to drill. My work area really isn't setup for this so it took some time to work up a jig that would hold the sight secure without marring the finish. Painters tape and pliers ended up doing the trick. The sight is drilled from both sides meeting in the middle. That's the theory but the bit walked a little on one side and I didn't catch it right away.

    The sight is again pressed into the miter and the holes aligned between the frame and the sight. A dab of loctight is applied to the pin and using a taped metal punch this time, driven back into the frame. Because of the less than perfect drilling the pin isn't perfectly flush with frame. I'll clean this up in a few days. A touch of cold blue was applied to the single scratch on the sight.

    Photo below. Not my best effort, nor my worst. Total time to remove the old sight blade and install the night sight was about an hour.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_0665.jpg  
    I find supremely ironic that God in his wisdom and grace has given man freedom of choice bounded by 10 simple rules. Man in his finite wisdom has created millions of rules to limit freedom of choice and personal responsibility of man.

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    Senior Member wmhawth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    The bottom feeders have been leaving the safe with regularity lately. Replaced by revolvers. Part of the downsizing plan.

    Anyway, I picked up a Smith and Wesson model 60 3" revolver a while back. Purchased a Trijicon front sight for it. Been meaning to install the sight and finally got around to doing just that this very evening.

    The factory front sight is pinned into a miter cut in the frame. The pin is a roll pin. It's supposed to be 1/16 inch but mine wasn't. Much smaller. I removed the cylinder and crane arm from the frame. Taped the frame on the side near the sight. Since the pin was so small I used a fine brass nail to drive the pin out. Then a few whacks with a mallet front to rear pushes the rear of the sight up out of the miter. Then gentle work frees the sight. That is the easy part.

    After cleaning the miter I fit tested the new sight. A few whacks of the mallet forces the sight into the barrel. Using a nail I scribed each side of the sight in a block. Removing the sight it's now time to drill. My work area really isn't setup for this so it took some time to work up a jig that would hold the sight secure without marring the finish. Painters tape and pliers ended up doing the trick. The sight is drilled from both sides meeting in the middle. That's the theory but the bit walked a little on one side and I didn't catch it right away.

    The sight is again pressed into the miter and the holes aligned between the frame and the sight. A dab of loctight is applied to the pin and using a taped metal punch this time, driven back into the frame. Because of the less than perfect drilling the pin isn't perfectly flush with frame. I'll clean this up in a few days. A touch of cold blue was applied to the single scratch on the sight.

    Photo below. Not my best effort, nor my worst. Total time to remove the old sight blade and install the night sight was about an hour.
    You actually need to use a #54 drill bit for that job. It is smaller than 1/16". That way if you're drilling the sight while it is in place in the gun you aren't enlarging the holes. I've done a couple of these. Those pins are not 1/16"
    Last edited by wmhawth; May 8th, 2018 at 09:25 PM.

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    Member Shootergramps's Avatar
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    Now! Where does it shoot.
    " There is nothing like getting shot at and missed. It's really great." Gen. James Mattis, USMC.

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    Senior Member ctr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shootergramps View Post
    Now! Where does it shoot.
    I'll find out this weekend. Could have altered the elevation point of impact but shouldn't have changed windage. It's going to be fun finding out.
    I find supremely ironic that God in his wisdom and grace has given man freedom of choice bounded by 10 simple rules. Man in his finite wisdom has created millions of rules to limit freedom of choice and personal responsibility of man.

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    Senior Member ctr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmhawth View Post
    You actually need to use a #54 drill bit for that job. It is smaller than 1/16". That way if you're drilling the sight while it is in place in the gun you aren't enlarging the holes. I've done a couple of these. Those pins are not 1/16"
    Drilling in place would have been so much easier.
    I find supremely ironic that God in his wisdom and grace has given man freedom of choice bounded by 10 simple rules. Man in his finite wisdom has created millions of rules to limit freedom of choice and personal responsibility of man.

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    Senior Member wmhawth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ctr View Post
    Drilling in place would have been so much easier.
    Yeah, the trick is to mount the sight and clamp it in place so it can't move and then drill half way in from both sides. You can also loctite the sight in and come back to it after the loctite has set up to do your drilling. Any way you go it takes a steady hand because there is a limited amount of real estate surrounding the hole and if you get sloppy you can easily ruin the sight. Don't ask me how I know that.

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    Senior Member jttar's Avatar
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    Nice job ctr, looks great in the picture. I'll be watching to see the range report.

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    Senior Member ctr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmhawth View Post
    Yeah, the trick is to mount the sight and clamp it in place so it can't move and then drill half way in from both sides. You can also loctite the sight in and come back to it after the loctite has set up to do your drilling. Any way you go it takes a steady hand because there is a limited amount of real estate surrounding the hole and if you get sloppy you can easily ruin the sight. Don't ask me how I know that.
    Steady and careful. I cleaned up the pin last night. Fully seated in the frame now. Delayed finishing up because I was tired, it was late, didn't want to rush, and I was nervous about possibly making a costly mistake.
    I find supremely ironic that God in his wisdom and grace has given man freedom of choice bounded by 10 simple rules. Man in his finite wisdom has created millions of rules to limit freedom of choice and personal responsibility of man.

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    Senior Member ctr's Avatar
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    Back from the range. The group is 3 inches high at 5 yards. The rear sight has insufficient adjustment to bring the group down to bullseye. Not sure what to do next.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I find supremely ironic that God in his wisdom and grace has given man freedom of choice bounded by 10 simple rules. Man in his finite wisdom has created millions of rules to limit freedom of choice and personal responsibility of man.

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