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Thread: The .410 For Sporting Use

  1. #16
    NUTS! Gen. McAuliffe Stumpkiller's Avatar
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    A Gozillion years ago I had a Garcia .22LR/.410 double "skeletal stock".

    It was neither a good rifle nor a good shotgun.

    I can get 20 gauge shells for less than .410, so I do most of my cartridge shot shell shooting in 20 gauge.
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    Senior Member oldskeetshooter's Avatar
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    After shooting skeet for 30+ years, I can assure you a .410 is a great round. A lot of clay target shooters use 3/4 oz loads in the 12 gauge and shoot it very well. Give them a .410 with 5/8 oz loads and its over. they cant hit anything. The .410, for it's size, is very forgiving. Due to shell geometry, the .410 has an extremely long shot column, which gives an extremely long shot string. This helps on moving targets. The biggest issue with a .410 is not the round, it is the shooter KNOWING that it is a .410. Confidence disappears.
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    For upland game, my favorite shotty is a Spanish Matador sxs 28 gauge.

    IMO, matching the handling and weight characteristics of the gun to the job is way more important than the size of the tube...and grouse hunting here is thru the thickest thickets and steep hills.
    They are always guaranteed to flush at 60 mph when you are tangled up.

    Good for squirrel and rabbits too.
    Last edited by Gman; December 25th, 2017 at 02:11 PM.
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    Senior Member CRAZE's Avatar
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    To me the only reason to use anything smaller than a 12 ga for sporting use is to get a gun that's a little bit smaller and lighter or the challenge/satisfaction of using the smaller cartridge. You can pretty much deal with the recoil issue of a 12 by just using lower powered ammo. The first shot gun I ever fired was a single shot .410 and as I remember it's not without recoil. I've only hunted with 20 and 12 gauge shot guns, and other than using hot 00 buck loads or 3'' mag turkey loads, I don't find much recoil difference in the field between 12 and 20. Been a long time since I used anything other than a 12 ga so I don't know how ammo currently compares but the last time I paid any attention comparable 12 and 20 gauge ammo was pretty much the same cost and 410 is more.

    All this said I do have a sweet spot in my heart for the 20 ga because it's my first hunting cartridge. I do think about getting another 20 ga just for nostalgia.

  5. #20
    Better Dead than Red. Struckat's Avatar
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    You all bring me back to when I was a kid crawling through the brush with my $70 H&R single shot .410. It was my primary grouse gun for many years. A 3” .410 with #4 shot put a lot of game on the grill. That particular gun had the added difficulty factor of a light strike every ten or so shots, always at the worst time. But I kept using it anyway.

    The .410 is my favorite, but you must respect its limits. I have always wanted a lever and a double .410. Also the semi autos have tempted me through the years. But price of the gun stops me every time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by oldskeetshooter View Post
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    After shooting skeet for 30+ years, I can assure you a .410 is a great round. A lot of clay target shooters use 3/4 oz loads in the 12 gauge and shoot it very well. Give them a .410 with 5/8 oz loads and its over. they cant hit anything. The .410, for it's size, is very forgiving. Due to shell geometry, the .410 has an extremely long shot column, which gives an extremely long shot string. This helps on moving targets. The biggest issue with a .410 is not the round, it is the shooter KNOWING that it is a .410. Confidence disappears.
    As you are an experienced skeet shooter don't most skeet competitions offer or require a .410, 28 gauge, 20 gauge, and a 12 gauge segment?
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    Quote Originally Posted by CRAZE View Post
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    To me the only reason to use anything smaller than a 12 ga for sporting use is to get a gun that's a little bit smaller and lighter or the challenge/satisfaction of using the smaller cartridge. You can pretty much deal with the recoil issue of a 12 by just using lower powered ammo. The first shot gun I ever fired was a single shot .410 and as I remember it's not without recoil. I've only hunted with 20 and 12 gauge shot guns, and other than using hot 00 buck loads or 3'' mag turkey loads, I don't find much recoil difference in the field between 12 and 20. Been a long time since I used anything other than a 12 ga so I don't know how ammo currently compares but the last time I paid any attention comparable 12 and 20 gauge ammo was pretty much the same cost and 410 is more.

    All this said I do have a sweet spot in my heart for the 20 ga because it's my first hunting cartridge. I do think about getting another 20 ga just for nostalgia.

    It is always different strokes for different folks. For me, it has nothing to do with recoil. Since I shoot trap, I shoot a 12 gauge almost every weekend. When I hunt quail, a .410 would be my only choice to preserve the meat. Pheasants are a different matter. In Illinois, a 20 gauge seems perfect, but west of the Mississippi, it is time for a 12 gauge because of the longer distances.
    Never take advice on self defense calibers or tactics from people who have never been in a real gunfight.

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